WorstPreviews.com Logo Join the community [Login / Register]
Follow WorstPreviews.com on Twitter
What\ News Coming Soon In Theaters On DVD Trailer,Posters,Pictures,Wallpapers, Screensavers PeliBlog.com Trivia/Quizzes
News/Headlines
Trailer for "Midnight Special" Sci-Fi Film, with Michael Shannon and Joel Edgerton
Nov 23rd, 2015
Trailer for "Central Intelligence" Comedy, with Dwayne Johnson and Kevin Hart
Nov 23rd, 2015
Trailer for Melissa McCarthy's "The Boss" Comedy
Nov 23rd, 2015
Trailer for Juan Antonio Bayona's "A Monster Calls"
Nov 23rd, 2015
First Look at "Central Intelligence" Comedy, with Dwayne Johnson and Kevin Hart
Nov 19th, 2015
Trailer for "Zoolander 2" Arrives Online
Nov 19th, 2015
Official Trailer for "Now You See Me" Sequel
Nov 19th, 2015
Trailer for Chris Hemsworth's "The Huntsman: Winter's War"
Nov 19th, 2015
Trailer for Keanu Reeves' "Exposed" Thriller
Nov 19th, 2015
First Look at Chris Pine on "Wonder Woman" Set
Nov 16th, 2015
Ridley Scott Reveals Another Title for "Prometheus" Sequel
Nov 16th, 2015
Gerard Butler is a God in "Gods of Egypt" Posters
Nov 16th, 2015
First Look at Liam Neeson in Martin Scorsese's "Silence"
Nov 16th, 2015
New Trailer for "The Divergent Series: Allegiant"
Nov 16th, 2015
Trailer for "Moonwalkers" Comedy, with Ron Perlman and Rupert Grint
Nov 16th, 2015
Trailer for Charlie Kaufman's "Anomalisa" Stop-Motion Film
Nov 3rd, 2015
Poster for "Warcraft" Arrives Online, Trailer Coming on Friday
Nov 3rd, 2015
There's a Good Reason Why Luke Skywalker Isn't on "Star Wars: The Force Awakens" Poster
Nov 2nd, 2015
First Trailer for Sacha Baron Cohen's "The Brothers Grimsby" Comedy
Nov 2nd, 2015
"Spectre" Breaks Box Office Records Overseas
Nov 2nd, 2015
Final Trailer for Ron Howard's "In the Heart of the Sea," with Chris Hemsworth
Nov 2nd, 2015
New Photos From "Warcraft" Video Game Movie
Nov 2nd, 2015
Lots of New Photos From "Suicide Squad"
Oct 30th, 2015
Trailer for "Dirty Grandpa" Comedy, with Robert De Niro and Zac Efron
Oct 30th, 2015
Sandra Bullock to Star in Female Version of "Ocean's Eleven"
Oct 30th, 2015
Trailer for Jared Hess' "Don Verdean" Comedy, with Sam Rockwell
Oct 30th, 2015
"Indiana Jones" Producer Says Harrison Ford Will Not Be Recast
Oct 28th, 2015
Trailer for Adam Sandler's "The Ridiculous 6" Comedy
Oct 28th, 2015
"The Walking Dead" Fan Kills Friend Who Turned Into a Zombie
Oct 28th, 2015
Another "Monopoly" Movie in the Works
Oct 28th, 2015
"Jumanji" Remake Hires "Con Air" Writer
Oct 26th, 2015
Disney's "Tower of Terror" Park Ride Movie Moving Forward
Oct 26th, 2015
Johnny Depp and Edgar Wright Team for "Fortunately, the Milk"
Oct 26th, 2015
Previous News Stories Next News Stories

Guy Pearce on "Prometheus 2" and Ben Stiller on "Zoolander 2"

Posted: June 22nd, 2014 by WorstPreviews.com Staff
Guy Pearce on "Prometheus 2" and Ben Stiller on "Zoolander 2"Submit Comment
Director Ridley Scott is working on a "Prometheus" sequel, which is set to hit theaters on March 4th, 2016. And while Michael Fassbender and Noomi Rapace will return, it will be difficult to bring back any other actors from the first film.

In a new interview, however, Guy Pearce expressed interested in reprising his role as Peter Weyland. "I'd love to go back and play that character again," he said. "I think it's possible. Who knows? When you look at science fiction and the ways things can develop -- technologically speaking -- anything's possible, really, isn't it?"

Meanwhile, Ben Stiller gave an update on his "Zoolander" sequel, which has been in the works for years. "I can't say that it's actually a reality yet, but I hope some day it is," he explained. "The film's been discussed and in some way in the works for 10 years. But there are no plans to start production any time soon."

Source: IGN, Variety, THR


Bookmark and Share
You must be registered to post comments. Login or Register.
Displaying 68 comment(s) Profanity: Turn On
PORN-FLY writes:
on June 22nd, 2014 at 7:53:36 AM

Stiller should work for DC
PORN-FLY writes:
on June 22nd, 2014 at 8:28:41 AM

set to hit theaters on March 4th, 2016

Meanwhile there has been twenty Marvel movies, nine Divergent films and eleventeen Hunger Games
boogiel writes:
on June 22nd, 2014 at 8:32:16 AM

Guy Pearce yes, Stiller No.
PORN-FLY writes:
on June 22nd, 2014 at 8:54:39 AM

..but I hope some day it is.

Not that i care but isnt it really all up to Stiller??
vincere01 writes:
on June 22nd, 2014 at 12:35:32 PM

Ben has to make it before his dad dies. A sequel without jerry would not be as enjoyable
bandolero999 writes:
on June 22nd, 2014 at 3:01:25 PM

Jews can last up to 100 yeArs
PORN-FLY writes:
on June 22nd, 2014 at 3:39:38 PM

LMFAO!^
vincere01 writes:
on June 22nd, 2014 at 4:43:37 PM

^^^ I thought I read somewhere that jerry was having health problems though. I could be wrong
minkowski writes:
on June 22nd, 2014 at 5:03:19 PM

"it will be difficult to bring back any other actors from the first film"



Let's give our Master of Understatement a round of applause, ladies and gentlemen.
minkowski writes:
on June 22nd, 2014 at 5:29:50 PM

"The film's been discussed and in some way in the works for 10 years. But there are no plans to start production any time soon."


No rush, buddy.

Stiller is like Kirk Douglas: hanging dearly on to life without anyone knowing it. Only difference is Douglas did something with his career.
minkowski writes:
on June 22nd, 2014 at 5:49:04 PM

Not much going on here at the WP. Guess I'll go draw something. Or shoot myself in the face. Whichever comes first.
triggax writes:
on June 22nd, 2014 at 6:13:02 PM

Douglas had a long prosperous career. I wouldn't say he did much more with it than Stiller has done with his, if we're counting length, then yeah he's done more with his career.

As a writer, producer and director, Ben Stiller has attempted to do as much for the medium as possible.

Kirk Douglas was just extremely good looking and great to watch on screen, he made a couple movies in the 70's I think... Posse? and some other pirate movie where he has a peg leg, which was an awful poorly written drag.

Still at least has a good concept of satire, he draws a lot of inspiration from Mel Brooks and the likes, in his earlier works.

Kirk Douglas is f*cking 99 years old or some sh*t, I can't believe he's still alive. He had an almost identical career to his son, good looking versatile actor, not worth a whole f*ck of a lot else outside of that. The blaring difference is that the son actually won a couple oscars where the father didn't even get nominated, sadly for Paths of Glory, arguably his greatest achievement as an actor.

He was a russian jew I think... Named Izzy, funny story people used to say how glowing the guy was back in the 30s and 40s and commented on the vitality of Douglas and said he would go on to live forever, and how about that, hes damn near 100 years old.

Anyhow, I don't think it's a very fair comparison, Douglas had a long career, but Still certainly has done a lot more for cinema than Kirk Douglas, funny they were both short steely eyed jews.

As for a Prometheus sequel, I am all in for it, as long as they can Lindelohf and bring Dan O'Bannon back from the dead to write this f*cker.

The only real problem with the first was the writing, they nailed the atmosphere, the acting was spot on, Fassbenders android was f*cking excellent, but their stories and how they got where they were going from the beginning of the movie to the end was non stop bullsh*t.

DL, Most likely assumed with the master back at the helm it made no f*cking difference how it was written and was either high as f*ck or sleeping.

Hmm, I also like Guy Pearce, for those of you looking to check out something possibly new to you, watch The Proposition this fine Sunday. The ending is probably somewhere in my top 50 endings of all time, f*cking great film, top notch sh*t start to finish.

Im rambling...
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
triggax writes:
on June 22nd, 2014 at 6:15:38 PM

That makes it sound like Kirk Douglas didn't get nominated for an oscar, he did. for like 2 or 3, specifically for that movie where he was Van Gogh, I dont remember the name, he was pretty good in it.

It was just sad that he didn't get nominated for Paths of Glory.
triggax writes:
on June 22nd, 2014 at 6:19:49 PM

I had to google it,

Kirk Douglas was born Issur Danielovitch

They called him Izzy Demsky.
minkowski writes:
on June 22nd, 2014 at 6:29:06 PM

Yep, Kirk hails from a family of Slavic Jews, and his longevity is probably genetic since places like Poland have herds of Ashkenazi Jews who live longer than everyone else.

http://forward.com/articles/140894/may-you-live-until--dna-uncovers-secrets-to-je/

There's even a billboard ad here in the US about it.




As for Stiller vs Kirk...AFI voted Kirk as "the 17th greatest male screen legend", starring in such films as The Glass Menagerie. 20000 Leagues and Spartacus.

Stiller? Dodgeball and Something about Mary.

Ben's just a terrible actor in that he's terrible to watch. Sure, the damned Jew has stuck his uncirc*mcised d*ck in fifty or more projects, but most of them are disposable filler it not outright trash like Zoolander.

Quality, not quantity. Because if that's the case, Roger Corman is a better director than James Cameron.
triggax writes:
on June 22nd, 2014 at 6:29:12 PM

Did anyone see The Killing, Stanley Kubrick, I just bought this DVD off eBay and it is the only Kubrick film I've never actually watched.

Any comments?
minkowski writes:
on June 22nd, 2014 at 6:33:11 PM

The Killing? Is that one of the many movies QT ripped off because he has no ideas of his own?
minkowski writes:
on June 22nd, 2014 at 6:35:36 PM

You actually thought I was gone, didn't you, Triggybaby?
triggax writes:
on June 22nd, 2014 at 6:37:44 PM

Roger Corman vs. James Cameron.

That's a debate!

I enjoyed plenty of Cormans films, seriously.

Cameron is an amazing technical filmmaker, but the only film he made with any real heart were the Terminator movies, which were technically amazing and perfect for their time, so it over shadowed any real substance they actually do have, well, terminator 2 kicks so much ass it pretty much trumps cormans entire career.

But!! Frankenstein Unbound was f*cking awesome

The Masque of the Red Death, I Mobster, The Trip, The Terror.

I mean, a far more interesting career and completely different take on making movies. Corman had cool f*cking friends too man, Fonda and Nicholson, they made some cool movies together...

I really like Roger Corman, call me crazy but I've seen a lot of not all of his films, that he directed, he produced like a billion sh*tty movies.. For the most part he isn't the worst director out there, he actually was the source of quite a bit of inspiration for Martin Scorsese and Frank Coppola, he had a cool stage like style.

It's comparing morse code to a f*cking iPhone 5 though. Really.
triggax writes:
on June 22nd, 2014 at 6:39:52 PM

"You actually thought I was gone, didn't you, Triggybaby?"

Maybe, haha, empty house, until 6. I was contemplating jacking off for the 4th f*cking time, but no youre still here.
bandolero999 writes:
on June 22nd, 2014 at 6:41:24 PM

Anyway guy Pearce needs to stay a supporting actor or do small films cause when if comes to movies like the time machine and lockout he stinks.
triggax writes:
on June 22nd, 2014 at 6:45:31 PM

Man, I could make an endless list of the sh*t QT rips off, and he gets away with it by paying tribute to the directors..

Kill Bill 2, probably still my favorite Tarantino movie, well, next to the ones he didn't direct, f*cking guy has no visual style at all, i'm sure if he directed Natural Born Killers, it would have been a Sergio Leone western starring Sonny Chiba and Yukata Nakajima as Mickey and Mallory.

He ripped off Brian De Palma so f*cking much I can't believe he didn't get his ass sued.

Watch the character interaction in The Wedding Party and then Watch the silent tension in Obsession and then Watch Reservoir Dogs and f*cking tell me QT even knows how to make a movie on his own without holding someone elses d*ck.
triggax writes:
on June 22nd, 2014 at 6:47:54 PM

True Romance is Tarantinos best film. Best story. Best execution, pity he will never be as good a filmmaker as Tony Scott.

Death Proof is the closest to total consistency in style but the movie was flatter than a 10 year old girl.
triggax writes:
on June 22nd, 2014 at 6:50:05 PM

Also, the Brian De Palma rip offs, before you say anything, I know De Palma wouldn't even have a career unless he constantly ripped off Hitchc*ck BUT at least he tried to mask it. Tarantino is f*cking blatant and doesn't give a f*ck.
minkowski writes:
on June 22nd, 2014 at 7:01:42 PM

I get what you're saying with Obsession, it being heavily inspired by Vertigo, and I get what you're saying with Reservoir Dogs, but QT does have a visual style, which is often encapsulated within his lighting and not his direction.

Watch Kill Bill 1 for instance. Each of the film's three segments is shot with different lighting IIRC, which is fairly interesting thematically, if not very clever or innovative.

And if QT had done Natural Born Killers, he would have cast a black dude and a white chick as the leads and they would have run around killing white people while spouting off empty rhetoric like Jackson's hollow table speech in Pulp Fiction, which is without a doubt one of the absolute most over-rated films in existence.

Really, what's the purpose of PF? QT's idea of Seventies cool epitomized in film? That's it? Damned thing doesn't have much of a story, even though it's named after a sub-class of literature, one that does the dime-novel written word far more justice than Pulp Fiction, which merely apes the essence of actual pulp novels, even though QT's stuffed the damned film with as much brutality and sexual deviance as he can.

Just not a fan of the man, and never will be, and I think he over-rates himself far more than even his most ardent fans, of whom I have little respect because they treat Taratino as more of a prophet of cinema instead of the unabashedly crude and often parodic imitator he is.
triggax writes:
on June 22nd, 2014 at 7:18:53 PM

I agree. Never "got" Pulp Fiction. Watchable flick but the most overrated film in history. If you want to see what a Tarantino movie looks like, look no further than Jackie Brown.

Jackie Brown is one of my favorite from Tarantino, not because of anything other than the fact that he tried to adapt a book into a film without stealing too much, even if it was a carbon copy of blacksploitation films from the 70s. I would say that is his style and he's pretty good at it. He's no Van Peebles but he does have a good eye for it.

but what does that tell you? He would make an excellent porn director.

also. Steven soderbergh made a better Jackie Brown with Out of Sight.

I'm on my phone now so my apologies for any errors.
minkowski writes:
on June 22nd, 2014 at 7:20:56 PM

"He would make an excellent porn director."

Yeah, foot porn.
minkowski writes:
on June 22nd, 2014 at 7:23:23 PM

The thing about Jackie Brown is DeNiro's role, especially the part wherein he has sex with and then murders Bridget Fonda c*m rolling skates. Quintessential modern Hollywood film-making, and I don't mean that in a good way. It's like it's almost QT's symbolic way of examining necrophilia without having DeNiro f*ck an actual corpse.

Pretty grim sh*t.
minkowski writes:
on June 22nd, 2014 at 7:30:55 PM

"Steven soderbergh made a better Jackie Brown with Out of Sight."

Perhaps, but JB was based on Leonard's Rum Punch whereas Out of Sight is based on Leonard's book of the same name. Different material and I suspect the quality of the novels have more to do with how well one turned out over the other, although I'm thinking that Soderbergh's Ocean's 11, a remake, is far more watchable than anything QT has ever made, so you might have a point, Trig.
triggax writes:
on June 22nd, 2014 at 7:38:58 PM

The more I get on about Tarantino the more it pisses me off.

I watch classic movies every single day, everything man, going back to Roger Corman even, he claims to give credit to Roger Corman for a lot of inspiration, so if you've seen everything and dissected it enough, please someone for the love of god show me where you even slightly see Roger Corman?

So what is he doing? He's ripping off other peoples inspiration, like it's not enough to blatantly rip people off and call it inspiration you have to rip off Martin Scorsese and then claim to be inspired by a huge inspiration of Martin Scorsese, no dude, you just f*cking stole his work.. Roger Corman had no hand in inspiring what you do.

Like you already mentioned, the killing and those long takes was what potentially could have inspired Reservoir Dogs not only that the entire story itself, I'm watching The Killing tonight finally, I guess I will have a better opinion on it after that, but from what I've heard it's embarrassing how obvious it is.. AND Reservoir Dogs, even the character names, mr blonde and pink and brown and so on. Who directing The Taking of Pelham 123? John Carpenter? Mr Blue, Mr Green, Mr Brown.. I mean honestly.

You talk about the lighting in Kill Bill, it wasn't anything innovative, watch a french film, watch ANYTHING by Godard, it changes throughout the different acts of the film.

Pulp Fiction, there is one specific scene that kills it for me, where they go to buddys apartment and he recites the ezekiel sh*t from the bible, f*cking scene for scene from The Killers with Burt Lancaster, I mean, shot for shot man.. What I don't understand is why take inspiration from all these places and people and films just to completely replicate what you saw, not even f*cking try and pull the wool over the audiences eyes.. I get it, Tarantino is a smart mother f*cker, 99% of the audience in the 90s and even now have never watch The Killers, and if they had and are part of the demographic that saw Pulp Fiction they sure as sh*t didn't put 2 and 2 together.

The list goes on.. he's a sh*t director, Christopher Nolan is Elia f*cking Kazan compared to this guy.
minkowski writes:
on June 22nd, 2014 at 7:44:33 PM

Speaking of ripping people off....I watched Time After Time last night, only to discover Bob Gale and Robert Zemeckis totally raped that movie for their Back to the Future 3 script. They even hired Mary Steamedburger to reprise the nearly exact same f*cking role, with Lloyd as the time-traveling scientist instead of McDowell.

They say in the business: amateurs create, professionals steal. No sh*t.

And I've mentioned numerous times how Cameron ripped off parts of Aliens from F. Paul Wilson's The Tomb. Not even pretending on that one. He totally lifted one key sequence, and if you've read the book and seen the movie, you'll know there's almost know f*cking way Commie, I mean Cammie, didn't rip off the book.

BTW, 2010 and The Tomb came out in 1984. Must have been a very busy year for Jim.
triggax writes:
on June 22nd, 2014 at 7:48:15 PM

Francois Traffaut - The Bride in Black or something to that effect, the copy I have has only the french title on it.

Either way, if you want to see where Kill Bill came from, watch it, I'll go find the French title, but a bride seeks revenge on 5 gang members that killed her husband during her wedding.... The movie even exaggerates the notebook with the names of the gang members being crossed out.

I mean, why do that? I can understand drawing inspiration in style and scenes and sh*t, but why rip off an entire movie and call it your own?... Because he is a pompous douche bag that believes he can do it better and puts no effort into anything he does.. He watches a bunch of sh*t that resembles the subject he wants to tackle and then just makes himself a f*cking buffet, its more sad than anything else.

I can't help but think, the script for that new film he wanted to make was leaked online and he said oh f*ck this and scrapped it, must have been a masterpiece...

A month later it's back on, he probably figured well f*ck it, not like I wrote the f*cking thing myself anyway. Not like it makes a difference, he's a f*cking database, he's the IMDB of directors, punch a bunch of numbers in and see what comes out.
minkowski writes:
on June 22nd, 2014 at 7:48:25 PM

"You talk about the lighting in Kill Bill, it wasn't anything innovative, watch a french film, watch ANYTHING by Godard, it changes throughout the different acts of the film."

That true, but the French New Wave inspired much of modern Hollywood's take, so you can't really say QT has no visual style just because Truffaut and Goddard did it better decades before, because that would invalidate 95% of everything from 1970 on.
minkowski writes:
on June 22nd, 2014 at 7:50:31 PM

@Trig: Bride in Black, huh?

I always took Kill Bill to be a gender reversal on the old Spaghetti Western trope of a man left for dead by a gang only for the man to live and seek revenge on the gang. See: Gibson's Payback, or Waingrow from Heat.
minkowski writes:
on June 22nd, 2014 at 7:53:14 PM

The thing is, if you see enough movies, you see patterns, and everything starts to repeat, which is why I have no patience for the young morons on here that belabor my rage against a Hollywood that repeats the same old sh*t without adding anything new while sh*tting on the quality of those who created the original patterns.

But young punks haven't seen much more than the ten or fifteen years of film, so they know d*ck and think in the arrogance of their youth ignorance is somehow wisdom.
triggax writes:
on June 22nd, 2014 at 7:59:54 PM

"Le Marie Etait En Noir"

The Bride WORE Black - According to google.

Either way, I get what you're saying but there are images that are exactly the f*cking same from these movies, you make thousands of movies everything is going to be recycled eventually, life is like that, but there's a difference between subtle similarities and just outright grand theft movie.
triggax writes:
on June 22nd, 2014 at 8:03:26 PM

Bob Gale has said specifically that they took a lot from Time After Time, excellent movie btw, it was a huge inspiration on them making the BTTF movies, but theres borrowing and then there is stealing, I wouldn't say they stole anything from Time After Time, the movies are completely different and only similar in tone. You can see the inspiration but not once did I stop and say, f*ck these guys that was word for word shot for shot from Time After Time, other than Mary Steenburgen and her dress...
triggax writes:
on June 22nd, 2014 at 8:05:16 PM

BTTF also plays out like HG Wells wrote a novel in his twilight for the 80's crowd, so I don't think it really applies, I think in literature and film it's hard not to replicate what Wells has already done when it comes to time travel.
minkowski writes:
on June 22nd, 2014 at 8:54:13 PM

@Trig,

They didn't directly plagiarize Time After Time for the first film, but they DID steal from Time After Time for Back to the Future 3. Trust me. Go watch Time after Time, and then watch Back to the Future.

No, there's no shot for shot theft per se, and that would be hard to do since McDowell was running around the streets of San Fran whereas Lloyd was gallivanting about the hills of Hilldale, but there are quite clear moments where the movies totally converge, many of them in fact, and those moments are simply not dependent on mere chance or synchronicity.

I think Gale and Zemeckis were originally inspired by TAT for the first BTTF, and I think they tried to do something of their own with Back to the Future 2, which failed imo because the first sequel has no character lead other than Biff who imo steals the film, and no plot except that of temporal manipulation. I think they then said, for the third one, let's just f*cking remake this movie (TAT), change some aspects to fit with the ending to Back to the Future 2, and be done with it.

Looks very much like that to me.
minkowski writes:
on June 22nd, 2014 at 8:56:02 PM

As for The Bride Wore Black, I'd have to see the movie for myself, but I entrust to you my faith you are correct.
Words of Wisdom writes:
on June 22nd, 2014 at 9:06:54 PM

A hirsute accountant drinks the soda of discontent.
minkowski writes:
on June 22nd, 2014 at 9:07:13 PM

"I think in literature and film it's hard not to replicate what Wells has already done when it comes to time travel."



Not really. Plenty of innovation has occurred within the concept of time travel since Wells. After all, Wells merely wrote about a ship going to the future, and nothing more, and the book isn't even really pure science fiction or time travel, but a parable on social classes, of the weak, apathetic elites enslaving the dirty underclass workers, with the former being "eaten" eventually by the latter, either via revolt or outright obliteration.

In fact, the entire book The Time Machine is nothing more than a literary means for Wells to expound on his belief that the future should be a boon for socialism by presenting, within his book, a ridiculous future wherein it is not, i.e., reductio ad absurdum, such that by giving the reader a view into the alleged preposterous future of capitalism, he or she would have to be convinced the future lay with socialism and not with market economics.

Not to mention that Wells' literary time travel is linear and doesn't even involve IIRC the time traveler returning to his home. One might argue that The Time Machine is barely even time travel literature since the traveler merely moves forward at a speed greater than everyone else. There's no paradoxes, no changes to time, no return to the past. He goes forward fast and stays there.

And all of this was well before Einstein's theories on time, especially generally relativity, which REALLY got the whole time travel thing going. For example, Kip Thorn and Nolan's unreleased Interstellar interpretation. Or Star Trek, which uses the other time-travel solution to general relativity, space warps.
minkowski writes:
on June 22nd, 2014 at 9:08:18 PM

There are, not there is
minkowski writes:
on June 22nd, 2014 at 9:19:33 PM

And I just want to point out to everyone here that theft from one movie to another doesn't singularly entail that of theft of shots or sequences.

By that, I mean simply that you can steal from a movie far more than how the director set up his shots. Sure, shot-stealing is more apparent and egregious, and certainly tackier and less professional, but a writer doesn't direct, usually, and he doesn't do shots unless it's a shooting script and even then that's usually the director's purview, IIRC.

So when someone decides they're going to "borrow" from one film or book to their film or book, it's often more than an act of inspiration and less than wholesale plundering of camera moves, which is why Jim Cameron had to give Harlan Ellison a credit for Terminator, even though Cameron didn't "borrow" a damned thing from Ellison except for ideas and concepts.


Long story short, theft is theft and inspiration is inspiration and though there is a thin line between the two, I would argue that much of what happens in Hollywood isn't inspiration, especially in more commercial works, which is what H-town makes to the exclusion of everything else. They even make products for the damned award shows, which we call Oscar-bait.

Hollywood merely views films as products, and products are constructed with reusable, mass-manufactured parts, and as we all know a motor in a lawn mower can power a bike, and a buttons on one machine can be adapted for use on another.

So...not much real dictionary-defined "inspiration" going on in Hollywood, and there hasn't been for more than a few decades; I think we would all agree that's pretty true to some degree.
triggax writes:
on June 22nd, 2014 at 9:23:56 PM

Did you ever see Somewhere in Time?

Really great time travel movie.

I'll take your word for it though. The physics of things isn't exactly my strongest area.
minkowski writes:
on June 22nd, 2014 at 9:31:53 PM

^^Yep. The book and the movie. Too bad Cameron "borrows" from the latter for Titanic.
minkowski writes:
on June 22nd, 2014 at 9:36:02 PM

Anyway, I watched Lake Placid the other day and I had no idea PETA was making horror movies. Not scary at all and rather dumb they choose to capture the monster instead of exterminating it. Not really heavy on the symbolism either, since the movie is basically a dumb crocodile flick.

Come on, it swam from the other side of the globe? Really? That's the best you can do? Plus the banter between Gleeson and Platt wore on me, and Fonda had no chemistry with Pullman.

I'd also admit Betty White cursing didn't do a thing for me since that gag was old with The Running Man.
minkowski writes:
on June 22nd, 2014 at 9:36:44 PM

I loathe this place.

*Chose.
minkowski writes:
on June 22nd, 2014 at 9:40:36 PM

And I still haven't fully watched Edge of Tomorrow even though I have a serviceable cam right there on my hard drive. Flipped through it and didn't see anything I like. Looks like Source Code married to Battle: Los Angeles with a few Matrix babies and some Elysium step-children.

Cruise as a new recruit was hard to take as well.
minkowski writes:
on June 22nd, 2014 at 9:43:22 PM

I also caught Frank Spotnitz's remake of Kolchak The Night Stalker, which ran for one season and featured Gabrielle Union.

Think: the face of Collateral, the police procedural brain of CSI, and the body of the X-Files. A real Frankenstein, but not bad. Not good enough to stay on the air, apparently, but serviceable sh*t if for no other reason than to enjoy Jungle Love visions of Union in low-cut blouses.
minkowski writes:
on June 22nd, 2014 at 9:46:40 PM

Somewhere in Slime, starring Lindsay Lohan.




One for old time's sake, I guess.
minkowski writes:
on June 22nd, 2014 at 9:58:05 PM

Oh yeah, Double Indemnity. Good movie, but MacMurray didn't really sell it to me, pun intended, seeing as how he went along with that murder plot just a wee bit too quickly and without much enticement other than an ankle bracelet.

Barbara Stanwyck was perfect as the murderess. Didn't really see much chemistry between her and MacMurray, though, and I thought Neff dating Lola was a riff only Hitchc*ck would dig.

Not Chandler's best work adapting Cain's novel, but then Ray fell off after The Big Sleep anyway.

A little long, and not really many sympathetic characters. I guess I was supposed to identify with Neff, but he went for murder a little to easily and without much remorse, and for what? A babe he didn't even want? Hell, the rest of the movie was essentially him sweating getting caught by super-Sherlock, Neff's boss, a guy who made the detectives in The Next Three Days look like The Keystone Cops.

Good, but not great. Hitchc*ck would've torn it up.
minkowski writes:
on June 22nd, 2014 at 10:09:39 PM

My bad, The Time Machine does have the traveler returning to his time, which didn't happen in the
Jeremy Irons, Guy Pearce flick, but did happen in the original novel and the 1960 movie.

My bad.

Still, That's kind of it, and if not for the technical time machine, it would be no more modern time travel than Twain's A Yankee in King Arthur's Court, published six years before.

Oh and Mitchell's The Clock That Went Backward came before any of them, even Wells' Chronic Argonaut.

trutsky465 writes:
on June 22nd, 2014 at 10:14:59 PM

Trig. The killing is a great film in my opinion. But I like the killers kiss more. Yet I always like artists earlier works. Much like Vonnegut's earlier work. Player piano is f*cking genius.
Tanman32123 writes:
on June 22nd, 2014 at 11:53:40 PM

Damn.. Missed some good rants today lol
Deaft0ne writes:
on June 23rd, 2014 at 12:02:50 AM

http://www.cracked.com/article_19826_6-iconic-scenes-ripped-off-from-lesser-known-movies.html
c-prime writes:
on June 23rd, 2014 at 12:03:10 AM

@ triggax: "The Killing" is pretty good, in my opinion. It stars Sterling Hayden in the lead role (I saw you mentioned "Dr. Strangelove" was your favorite Kubrick picture in an earlier thread, so you should instantly recognize his face). I'd say what's most noteworthy about the film are its concise run time (roughly, it's a scant 90 minutes, much shorter in length than most of his output from the sixties onward) and snappy, classic film noir exchanges between characters. (Interestingly, Kubrick hired a crime novelist to write the dialogue, while the director himself fleshed out the rest of the script.)

I wouldn't call "The Killing" one of my favorite Kubrick movies, however. If I were to make a comparison, it's the equivalent of Wes Anderson's "Bottle Rocket" (albeit far superior to that flick): a pleasant, modestly-scaled cinematic breakthrough from a budding auteur who hadn't yet reached the peak of his powers.


A must-see if you're a fan.
Deaft0ne writes:
on June 23rd, 2014 at 12:15:58 AM

I forgot to add that even Kubrick was not above copying from other films.
trutsky465 writes:
on June 23rd, 2014 at 12:33:33 AM

At c-prime. What did you think of Barry Lyndon? And tie is true at some moments most artists have bitten too much from someone elses work. Its a tricky bitch if one gets too caught up in something or they just run out of ideas.
c-prime writes:
on June 23rd, 2014 at 12:56:53 AM

@ trutsky465: Well, sh*t.

I'm embarrassed because, to tell you the truth, I've never seen "Barry Lyndon". Been meaning to for quite a while; the Blu-Ray's been sitting in my movie cabinet, unopened, for going on two years now, but I just haven't gotten around checking it out. I don't really have a good reason - I guess the three-hour run time is just daunting to me on a subconscious level. (It's funny because I'm not one to ever complain about a film's length, unless it contains too many extraneous elements, and I'm certain once I buckle down and watch the film I'll be transfixed the entire time.) Same with "Lolita" - it's just been sitting around the house collecting dust.

Tell you what, though: I'll consider your query a wake-up call and attempt to watch it later this week, since I'm getting some extended time off from work. Truly, I've been dying to see the stunning natural-light photography people have raved to me about in that flick. I'm sure you'll attest the same? I'll do a brief write-up about it after it's over and discuss it with you. Sound good?

f*ck, just realized I've never seen "Spartacus", either. I'm a disgrace.
triggax writes:
on June 23rd, 2014 at 1:25:58 AM

Cprime


You've never seen Spartacus?

Tbh it does not feel like a Kubrick film. More of a show boating glamour pic for Kirk Douglas.

Kubrick signed on after the original crew slightly fell apart. You see just a few shots it seems as though he may have had control over.

Douglas was f*cking huge even before Spartacus. Already 2 Oscar noms and had already worked with Kubrick. So it was a vanity project for a beautiful vain man. Not as landmark as some would have you believe.

Barry Lyndon is a massive exercise in patience. The entire film is lit with absolutely zero electricity. If it accomplishes anything its f*cking authentic. Excellent film. More of a lesson in film making than anything overly entertaining. As a lover of movies as I know you are you will walk away with a lot from Barry Lyndon.
triggax writes:
on June 23rd, 2014 at 1:32:16 AM

Also. I watched The Killing.

It was mildly enjoyable. The Bottle Rocket comparison makes perfect sense. Just does not live up to his eventual capabilities as a film maker. I felt very intrigued with the dialog and interaction between its leading cast. The writing was phenomenal. Excellent attention to detail and absolutely felt like an extremely important beginning to an extremely important career.
c-prime writes:
on June 23rd, 2014 at 1:42:47 AM

@ triggax: That's good to hear. I imagine I'll enjoy the movies

"Kubrick signed on after the original crew slightly fell apart. You see just a few shots it seems as though he may have had control over."

I read the stories. After the first director left the project, Kirk Douglas (who was a producer on the film, I think) managed to talk ol' Kubrick into filling the vacant spot. (Assumedly, the actor must've enjoyed the experience of working with him on 1957's "Paths of Glory" [good movie, by the way].) What's funny is that they apparently couldn't recapture that magic and clashed repeatedly on set, so much so that Douglas vowed he would never work with Kubrick ever again afterwards. What's more, Douglas admitted in interviews years later that he regretted the way things turned out with the original director and that he wished that guy had stayed on the project. I think he even added that he would be open to a second chance at collaborating with him again in the future.
c-prime writes:
on June 23rd, 2014 at 1:53:27 AM

I meant more to add to that last comment, but I accidentally tapped the post button. I'll tack the some more on probably in a moment.

"I felt very intrigued with the dialog and interaction between its leading cast."

The repartee between the cuckold husband and his scheming wife characters is probably the most memorable of all the exchanges in the entire film. The way he just dotes on her and she reciprocates with nothing but ambivalence and scorn is so priceless.

Don't know if you happened to acquire the Criterion edition of the film, but it has some nice bonus features that are worth a look. One was an interview with Sterling Hayden from his home in the early eighties (about a couple years before he passed). He just stands on his balcony overlooking a vast California expanse, smokes a cigar, and rambles about his work. He was a real idiosyncratic fella, which makes the piece incredibly hysterical to watch.
minkowski writes:
on June 23rd, 2014 at 4:45:05 AM

I see Alex still hasn't updated the damned news. What a loser.

He must do that right after dropping a can of Friskies in Dusty's sh*t bowl.
minkowski writes:
on June 23rd, 2014 at 4:51:21 AM

Just finished Out of Sight. Definitely a far better film than Jackie Brown even if the ending made no sense.

Excellent use of music and I loved Soderbergh's jazzish editing and direction which worked beautifully well with the complimentary music.

Brilliant colors, wonderful art direction, brisk pace and wonderful characters, even if Cheadle's Snoop was underdeveloped.

Could have used a bit more on the connections between Rhames and Clooney, a bit more backstory development, but all in a all a nice balance of romance, comedy, action and suspense.

Great job. Just should have worked on that ending.
vincere01 writes:
on June 24th, 2014 at 1:35:42 AM

Queertin Terriblino not only steals from other directors and movies already made. He steals scripts from college students who send them to him for feedback. Hes a classless *sshole
BlackDynamite writes:
on June 24th, 2014 at 6:24:05 AM

I don't even remember Guy Pearce being in Prometheus, and I won't be watching it again to see who he played. That being said, I like the guy and if he's in Prometheus 2, I'll begrudgingly see it.

Stiller, most of us didn't want a Zoolander 1. Go make 6 more subpar Night at the Museum movies that never capture the "magic" of the original.

There's a Good Reason Why Luke Skywalker Isn't on "Star Wars: The Force Awakens" Poster

"The Walking Dead" Fan Kills Friend Who Turned Into a Zombie

"Indiana Jones" Producer Says Harrison Ford Will Not Be Recast

Ridley Scott Reveals Another Title for "Prometheus" Sequel

"Star Wars: The Force Awakens" Demolishes Pre-Sale Records

"Spectre" Breaks Box Office Records Overseas

Paul Bettany Responds to Jason Statham's "Avengers" Insult

Daniel Craig Would Rather Commit Suicide Than Return as James Bond

Johnny Depp and Edgar Wright Team for "Fortunately, the Milk"

Marvel Has Contingency Plans In Case It Regains Rights to Superheroes
Lace Wedding Dresses from ViViDress UK online shop, buy with confidence and cheap price.
WorstPreviews.com hosted by pair Networks WorstPreviews.com
Hosted by pair Networks
News Feeds | Box Office | Movie Reviews | Buzz: Top 100 | Popularity: Top 100
Poster Store | About Us | Advertising | Contact Us | Privacy Policy | Web Tools | Site Map
Copyright © 2009 WorstPreviews.com. All rights reserved